Butternut Squash Houmous 

I’ve been rather silent this week as we are currently in the middle of renovating the barn we are moving into. We only have 4 weeks to finish it so it’s been rather hectic! At the moment it’s seems miles off being finished but I’m assured it will be ready on time! All our spare time has been spent painting, sanding and doing general donkey work to speed the job up. I wouldn’t mind moving into a house that wasn’t finished a few years ago, but now we have Will I am much more anxious that things are finished. Busy baby who is furniture cruising and into everything plus building site- no thank you! In fact, the whole moving with a baby scenario is bonkers. Filling one box takes hours as Will likes to play boo/needs a feed/doesn’t want to pack! Every night I look at the house and wonder what I can actually pack- babies need a lot of things every day, it’s all going to have to be packed at the last minute.  I certainly haven’t stopped cooking though! If anything I’m cooking more as I find it a brilliant way to relax. 

I have made this particular recipe for years and years, but have avoided sharing it for one reason and one reason alone – the spelling of the word ‘houmous’! There are SO many versions out there and I simply wasn’t sure what to write. Then I made it the other day and Will was such a huge fan of it that I decided to bite the bullet, choose a spelling and share the recipe. 
Houmous features in our weekly meals quite often, I find it handy to keep in the fridge to add to sandwiches, salads or as an impromptu snack. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, but having healthy snacks to hand really ensures I make better food decisions (most of the time – sometimes I still decide that a ginormous bar of cadburys whole nut is completely necessary)! 

While there is very little wrong with some shop bought versions, homemade really does taste better. I use my nutribullet to blitz the ingredients making it both quick and low on washing up (vital in my kitchen).  It can also be made from mostly store cupboard ingredients. 

Houmous is also an excellent food for babies and children. This version is full of protein and fibre from the chickpeas, and the butternut squash adds a lovely sweetness that children love. They can scoop it with their favourite vegis or breadsticks and it’s completely free of salt, stabilisers, preservatives or other unnecessary ingredients the shop bought offerings include. 

I have substituted the squash for carrots or sweet potato in the past, but the squash is my favourite. 

Ingredients

  • 400g butternut squash, in cubes
  • Half a can of chickpeas 
  • 2 cloves of garlic, skin on
  • 2 Tbsp tahini 
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 40ml extra virgin olive oil 
  • Sprinkle of smoked paprika

Method 

  • Peel and cube the butternut squash and roast in in a little olive oil with the garlic cloves until it is soft and browning at the edges (about 30 minutes)
  • Squeeze the garlic cloves to remove ththe sweet cooked garlic from their skins and place in the blender with the squash 
  • Drain the chickpeas and add them to blender with the lemon juice, tahini and olive oil. 
  • Blend until you have a textured paste 
  • Pop in th fridge to chill completely 
  • To serve I like to drizzle it with some more olive oil and some smoked paprika.

This is perfect with crudités or breadsticks as well as being great in wraps or as an accompaniment to a salad. It keeps in the fridge for 3 days if covered, although it’s normally eaten before this in our house! 

Well, that was my little break, now it’s time to choose bathroom tiles! 

Apple Crumble Bites 

Will was born last summer and this meant I started weaning him in January- the 25th of January to be exact. Someone bought us a baby record book and I have thanked them so many times as I have written so much down that I would otherwise have forgotten in my sleep-deprived new Mum fog! I loved the process of introducing him to food, both as purees and finger foods, but I really struggled with fruit. Winter fruit in Britain is awful, or I should say winter fruit in Britain that babies can eat is awful! I tried, on a number of occasions to buy melons or strawberries but buying these fruits out of season is a futile exercise – they tasted of swede! It seemed that the only fruits on his menu for the first month or two were apples, pears and dried fruits such as figs, prunes and apricots.

The other problem with winter fruit is that its not that suitable to eat as finger food. On numerous occasions I bought pears that actually went off before they became soft enough for my little one to gum, and raw apples were definitely not going to be suitable. Inspiration finally struck when I was making a crumble for a family lunch. It occurred to me that aside from at the sugar that most crumbles are filled with, it was a pretty baby-friendly pudding. I decided to deconstruct it and these apple crumble bites were the outcome.

The apple is baked and therefore soft enough for young babies to gum or chew, whilst the crumble coating is sugar free yet delicious and turns the humble apple chunk into a really tasty pudding or snack. These have now become a staple make in my kitchen. I offer them to Will on their own, or as an edible spoon with a yoghurt or fruit puree dip. My husband and I enjoy them with yoghurt and maple syrup, on top of rice pudding (amazing) or even with a bowl of warm custard! They are lovely warm or cold and keep well in the fridge for 48 hours.

The ingredients you need are limited, they are fast to make and healthy. They also increase the nutrient and calorie content of fruit for your little one- always good as they need plenty to keep them growing!

 

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Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsps rolled oats
  • 2 Tbsp ground almonds
  • 1 tsp cinnamon (or to taste, you could also use ginger)
  • 2 apples

 

Method

  • Peel and core 2 apples and chop each apple into 6 chunks
  • Place in an oven tray and pop in a preheated oven at 180c
  • In a small bowl combine the oats, ground almonds and cinnamon
  • After 5 minutes pull the apple out of the oven- it should be warmed through and ever so slightly damp, this will ensure the dry ingredients stick to it.
  • Ensuring the apple isn’t too hot to touch, coat each slice in the dry ingredients and place on a lined baking tray or a cupcake tray.
  • Bake at 180c for 15 minutes until the apple feels soft and the crumble coating is golden.img_6236

 Now that summer fruit is available I have been making these less. But I made them again the other day as the weather has turned really damp and grey here and we were all in need of something cozy for brunch. I fell in love with them all over again and had to share them with you.

What are your favourite ways to use apples? I’d love to hear!

 

The Most Versatile Bread Dough

There is no doubt that being a parent reduces the amount of time you can spend in the kitchen. I like to get Will involved in cooking where possible but at 10 months old  what he can safely do is rather limited. He is pulling himself up on all the furniture at the moment and we have stone floors so I’m terrified of him hurting himself! I am wondering about buying a playpen so I can pop him somewhere and know he is safe. Regardless of his new  found independence,  I still believe its important for him to get used to spending time in the kitchen. I have found that his highchair is a great place for him to sit and observe what is going on; he is high enough to see the worktops. I tend to give him kitchen implements to play with as I cook – he adores silicone baking trays, the sieve and  wooden spoons! If this fails there is always food- a strawberry tends to keep him happy for 5 minutes or so! Bread making is, as cooking goes, rather baby friendly as it only really takes 15 minutes at a time, which even the most impatient little one should hopefully sit through. This dough in particular is a fantastic thing to make as from one batch you can make a whole variety of bread-types! I have used it to make pizza bases, pitta breads, flatbreads, bread rolls and even bread sticks. I have reduced the salt as much as is possible to ensure it is suitable for little ones, and because of the flours used it requires no sugar.

Ingredients

  • 200g wholewheat strong flour
  • 50g strong white flour
  • 250g plain white flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1tsp yeast
  • 20ml virgin olive oil  plus a little extra for the proving bowl
  • 340ml of warm water (could be more or less depending on the weather that day)

Method

  • Add the flours, yeast and oil to a large bowl
  • Add the salt to a well in the flour, ensuring it is kept away from the yeast
  • Add some of the water and combine, keep adding water until you have a slightly sticky dough. It is meant to be more hydrated than a traditional bread dough but this is correct, it becomes less so as its kneaded.
  • Knead for 10-15 minutes by hand or 15 minutes in a mixer. The dough should be springy and stretch-able.
  • Oil the mixing bowl, and place the dough in the bowl, covering with cling film or a damp tea towel.
  • Leave somewhere warm for 1 1/2 hours or until its doubled in size, it may take 2 hours

At this stage you can make different things:

Bread Rolls

This recipe makes 8-9 bread rolls

  • Roll fist-size balls of dough and place on a baking tray, let them prove until they have doubled in size again; this will take 45 minutes or so.
  • Bake in a pre heated oven for 12-15 minutes until they are golden and have a hollow sound
  • To add a crusty top sprinkle a little water on each one directly before popping them in the oven

Flat breads

This recipe makes 10 flatbreads

  • Take a fist-size ball of dough and flatten out on a floured surface until they are around 3 mm thick.
  • Leave to rest for 10 minutes
  • Get a frying pan as hot as you can (open the windows!)
  • Lay one flat bread in to the hot pan and cook on one side for around 2 minutes or until it is bubbling up and browning. They will get a little scorched but it tastes wonderful
  • Flip and cook the other side for a further minute
  • These can be eaten straight away or left to cool under a tea towel. The tea towel ensures the steam circulates around the flatbreads and keeps them soft.

Pittas

This recipe makes 12-14 pittas

  • Follow the flatbread method but make them slightly smaller and oval shaped.
  • Place them on a baking tray and cook in a preheated oven at 200C for 5-10 minutes until they are puffed up and gaining a little colour.

Bread Sticks

These are a real favourite in our house! Brilliant with dips and great for teething babies to gnaw on.

  • Roll out small balls of dough, about the size of a strawberry
  • Roll these out until you have long breadsticks
  • Place on a floured baking tray and leave to rest for 5 minutes
  • Cook in a preheated oven at 200C for about 10 minutes until they are crisp and golden

This dough really is a’jack of all trades’. I often double the quantity and make a few things in one go, today I made some rolls for lunch and some flatbreads for supper. I added some cumin seeds and nigella seeds to the flatbreads when I shaped them to add a little Middle-Eastern influence as they are accompanying a tagine. As with all home-made bread, because there are no nasty preservatives it doesn’t last as long as shop-bought alternatives, but the taste is so superior it won’t last long enough to go stale anyway!

I’d love to hear from you if you try the recipe, Happy baking!